Untitled
buzzfeedlgbt:

David Stern Mocks IOC For Tentativeness On Gay Rights

“I’m gonna behave myself, for the record here, which is unlike me,” NBA commissioner David Stern said Wednesday, speaking as part of a panel that included Ed Rendell and was moderated by ESPN anchor and Philly native Kevin Negandhi. “But you know, the first phone call to the new head of the Olympics [was] from President [Vladimir] Putin, and everyone wants to talk about the Russian law on homosexuality. Think about the opportunities that sports have to make a continuing statement, and the only thing that we’re saying in that context is ‘Shhhh! No one say anything!’”

buzzfeedlgbt:

David Stern Mocks IOC For Tentativeness On Gay Rights

“I’m gonna behave myself, for the record here, which is unlike me,” NBA commissioner David Stern said Wednesday, speaking as part of a panel that included Ed Rendell and was moderated by ESPN anchor and Philly native Kevin Negandhi. “But you know, the first phone call to the new head of the Olympics [was] from President [Vladimir] Putin, and everyone wants to talk about the Russian law on homosexuality. Think about the opportunities that sports have to make a continuing statement, and the only thing that we’re saying in that context is ‘Shhhh! No one say anything!’”

icontherecord:

Additional Declassified Documents Relating to Section 702 of FISA
August 21, 2013
May 4, 2012 — Letters to the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Leadership regarding Section 702 Congressional White Paper entitled The Intelligence Community’s Collection Programs Under Title VII of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance ActOctober 31, 2011 — Minimization Procedures Used by the National Security Agency in Connection with Acquisitions of Foreign Intelligence Information Pursuant to Section 702, as amendedAugust 2013 — Semi-Annual Assessment of Compliance with the Procedures and Guidelines Issued Pursuant to Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, Submitted by the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence

ourpresidents:

Truman Announces the Surrender of Japan

Today in history, August 14, 1945, President Truman announced the surrender of Japan, ending World War II.

The photos here show reporters running through the White House after hearing the President’s announcement.  

Images:

Reporters running through the White House upon hearing the news; Reporters grabbing White House press releases about the surrender. 8/14/45.

-from the Truman Library

buzzfeed:

Oh. 

buzzfeed:

Just a little perspective: this is Saturn and its rings and that far off tiny dot is Earth. 

buzzfeed:

Just a little perspective: this is Saturn and its rings and that far off tiny dot is Earth. 

georgetakei:

Clearly giving him paws.

georgetakei:

Clearly giving him paws.

buzzfeed:

Oh Walmart, you never disappoint.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 22, 1941: Germany Invades Soviet Union, Violating the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact
On this day in 1941, Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union in the largest land invasion in world history, codenamed Operation Barbarossa. Two years earlier, Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union had signed a nonaggression pact, which guaranteed that the two countries would not attack each other.
Over 3 million German troops, 3,600 tanks and 2,700 aircraft swarmed the Soviet Union. Within the first month, German forces had successfully destroyed four thousand Soviet aircrafts and ninety percent of Soviet tanks. By December 1941, German forces had taken control of Kiev, Ukraine, destroyed the Red Army’s front line, and taken over 2 million Soviet prisoners.

Visit Behind Closed Doors’ timeline of theearly battles between Germany and the Soviet Union.
Photo: A Photograph of German Tanks Advancing towards a Soviet Village during Operation Barbarossa. October 29th, 1941. (Photo by Fotosearch/Getty Images)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

June 22, 1941: Germany Invades Soviet Union, Violating the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact

On this day in 1941, Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union in the largest land invasion in world history, codenamed Operation Barbarossa. Two years earlier, Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union had signed a nonaggression pact, which guaranteed that the two countries would not attack each other.

Over 3 million German troops, 3,600 tanks and 2,700 aircraft swarmed the Soviet Union. Within the first month, German forces had successfully destroyed four thousand Soviet aircrafts and ninety percent of Soviet tanks. By December 1941, German forces had taken control of Kiev, Ukraine, destroyed the Red Army’s front line, and taken over 2 million Soviet prisoners.

Visit Behind Closed Doors’ timeline of theearly battles between Germany and the Soviet Union.

Photo: A Photograph of German Tanks Advancing towards a Soviet Village during Operation Barbarossa. October 29th, 1941. (Photo by Fotosearch/Getty Images)

georgetakei:

Soon there will be kids who won’t know what their “save” icon is. Scary.

georgetakei:

Soon there will be kids who won’t know what their “save” icon is. Scary.

michaelfitzsimmons:

“Surfing Symbiont”. Photo by Michael Fitzsimmons. Full portfolio at www.500px.com/MFitz

michaelfitzsimmons:

“Surfing Symbiont”. Photo by Michael Fitzsimmons. Full portfolio at www.500px.com/MFitz